Kids with Asthma in schools
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|   Oct 10, 2014
Kids with Asthma in schools

Asthma is a chronic disease involving the airways in the lungs. These airways, or bronchial tubes, allow air to come in and out of the lungs.

Advice to Parents whose children have Asthma:

Inform:

It is very essential for the parents to inform the school authorities including the class teacher that your child has Asthma (and for that matter any chronic illness!!). It is observed that the parents shy away from providing information about their child’s illnesses with the fear in their minds that it will be known to other children/parents, however, they fail to visualize the situation that if their child suffers from any such episode during school hours and the teachers are not aware of such a history, consequences can be frightening.

Parents of any child, who has a history of asthma, should share the following information with the staff at the beginning of the academic session:

  • Medications your child takes and their dosages
  • Your child's asthma triggers
  • Early symptoms of a flare-up
  • What to do if your child is having a flare-up, including when to seek emergency care.

Take care of the triggers:

Some common triggers of asthma are molds, dust mites, cockroaches, chalk dust, perfumes, cleaning products or certain chemicals.

Make Suggestions to the School Authority:

You might also want to make some suggestions for the school, such as:

  • Ask teachers to use "dustless" chalk or dry-erase boards, as chalk dust maybe an asthma trigger.
  • Ask the staff to avoid using perfumed cleaning products or soaps.
  • Propose the use of air conditioners and dehumidifiers.
  • Oral and intravenous corticosteroids and other emergency medications to be available in the school medical room for acute asthma flare-ups or for severe symptoms. These medications should be administered under the guidance of a health professional.
  • A wheel chair to be available in the school medical room every time.
  • Ask that any classroom where art supplies are used or locker rooms where mold can grow, be well ventilated.
  • The teachers and staff to be trained in dealing with asthma emergency so as to identify danger signs and take immediate steps to transfer the child to nearest medical facility.
  • Make sure that the school is vacuumed and dusted regularly, that it's routinely treated for pest control and most importantly, that it's completely smoke free.

Self Help:

  • A meeting with your child's teacher and other school staff at the start of every school year can also be helpful for making sure that arrangements are in place.
  • Some children have exercise-induced asthma and they should have their medication available before any strenuous play or exercise.

Asthma is a chronic disease involving the airways in the lungs. These airways, or bronchial tubes, allow air to come in and out of the lungs.

Advice to Parents whose children have Asthma:

Inform:

It is very essential for the parents to inform the school authorities including the class teacher that your child has Asthma (and for that matter any chronic illness!!). It is observed that the parents shy away from providing information about their child’s illnesses with the fear in their minds that it will be known to other children/parents, however, they fail to visualize the situation that if their child suffers from any such episode during school hours and the teachers are not aware of such a history, consequences can be frightening.

Parents of any child, who has a history of asthma, should share the following information with the staff at the beginning of the academic session:

  • Medications your child takes and their dosages
  • Your child's asthma triggers
  • Early symptoms of a flare-up
  • What to do if your child is having a flare-up, including when to seek emergency care.

Take care of the triggers:

Some common triggers of asthma are molds, dust mites, cockroaches, chalk dust, perfumes, cleaning products or certain chemicals.

Make Suggestions to the School Authority:

You might also want to make some suggestions for the school, such as:

  • Ask teachers to use "dustless" chalk or dry-erase boards, as chalk dust maybe an asthma trigger.
  • Ask the staff to avoid using perfumed cleaning products or soaps.
  • Propose the use of air conditioners and dehumidifiers.
  • Oral and intravenous corticosteroids and other emergency medications to be available in the school medical room for acute asthma flare-ups or for severe symptoms. These medications should be administered under the guidance of a health professional.
  • A wheel chair to be available in the school medical room every time.
  • Ask that any classroom where art supplies are used or locker rooms where mold can grow, be well ventilated.
  • The teachers and staff to be trained in dealing with asthma emergency so as to identify danger signs and take immediate steps to transfer the child to nearest medical facility.
  • Make sure that the school is vacuumed and dusted regularly, that it's routinely treated for pest control and most importantly, that it's completely smoke free.

Self Help:

  • A meeting with your child's teacher and other school staff at the start of every school year can also be helpful for making sure that arrangements are in place.
  • Some children have exercise-induced asthma and they should have their medication available before any strenuous play or exercise.

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